Want to put your brain to good use?

child Head

(Part Two of Data Today – Better Tomorrow)

Could this be you? Creating a better tomorrow through brain research??

It turns out one does not have to be a pro football linebacker to have a brain worth studying. One does not even need to have a brain like Albert Einstein’s, Steven Hawking’s or any of those scientists/exceptionalists/geniuses whose brains would seem worth figuring out.

One only needs to be 18 or over and willing to be studied, and then to go sign up on the Brain Health Registry. This entitles you to sit back and wait for your brain to help discover a cure for Alzheimer’s or ADHD or depression, or perhaps help find better ways to treat traumatic brain injury. Not bad, for just having a brain and investing a little time (no money.)

This writer got off to a sluggish start as a Brain Health Registry member. Signed up early on because it sounds like such a great endeavor, but then I ran into a few off-putting instructions like “This will take about 20 minutes. It is best done in a quiet room where there will be no distractions or interruptions.” Twenty minutes, quiet rooms and absence of distractions are three things hard to come by around my house.

Eventually, however, the requisite conditions were found, and I was off to create a better tomorrow – well, in partnership with a few thousand other participants and some very smart neuroscientists – by finding out stuff about the human brain. And this is one fascinating journey. The neuroscientists find it fascinating because they really are going to figure stuff out. But for participants, the fascination is in the process.

Participants enter a little basic, very general data about medical/family history etc. Then the fun begins. We have two sets of ‘Cognition’ tests aimed at assessing our memory, attention and other cognitive characteristics. “These tests give us a sense of how your brain is currently functioning,” the screen says. This participant can only wonder what the Brain Health assessment people think about how her brain is functioning. The ‘Cognition’ tests are computer games on steroids. For a while you try to remember and replicate the pattern of dots, and then you go to the card games. The card games require Yes or No answers about what the cards are doing, press D for Yes and K for No. My brain kept trying to tell me what the cards were doing, while my fingers tried to remember that K was not for Yes.

It is, all in all, a lot more fun that the computer games the rest of the world is playing.

In another three to six months, the BHR people will be reminding me to go back and do it again, or do something else, to see how the brain is getting along. Perhaps they will flag my entry and advise me to check myself into an institution. But more likely they will just combine my data with the data of a zillion more or less anonymous others – and find a cure for Alzheimer’s! Or depression! Or improvements in treatment of traumatic brain injuries! All with the help of my weary, aging brain. Plus, when the survey was completed I got an email from UCSF professor Michael Weiner, MD telling me I am a medical hero. “You’re helping to make brain research faster, better and less expensive – and ultimately that gets us closer to a cure for Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, and other brain disorders that strike tens of millions of Americans every year.” Who could resist?

You may want to go straight over to the Brain Health Registry and join the fun.

Your brain at 100+

Since about 1900, when the average lifespan for U.S. citizens was somewhere around 50, we’ve been pushing that boundary ever upward. Today, depending on exactly where you live and other factors like cigarettes and French fries, you can expect to hang on into your eighties and beyond. That’s fine with most of us, especially if our brains stay functional too – and therein lies the problem.

There is reason to believe, if neurological studies on worms prove out, that humans could live to be 300 with a little genetic tinkering. If you sign up for this, a possibility predicted by University of California San Francisco neuroscientist Dena Dubal, you might want to have Dr. Dubal and her colleagues nearby for your brain care.

At a recent luncheon in San Francisco, Dr. Dubal and fellow UCSF research scientist Wade Smith talked of the work going on in their labs as if it were simply what they do for a living. To a spellbound audience, however, it sounded more like miracle-making. “Just a little genetic tinkering.” Altering the aging process, staving off dementia… it’s all in a day’s work. A little extra Clotho (so designated for the anti-aging Greek goddess of the same name) blocked memory loss in mice, Dr. Dubal said; it’s reasonable to project that similar treatment might some day be made available to mammals.

This reporter came home, followed a few of those links and was quickly lost, which is attributable — in part, at least, we hope — not to short-term memory loss but to my degrees in Art and Short Fiction vs the very long list of degrees plus other academic and scientific credentials of Drs. Dubal and Wade.

For those of us already worried about the relentless increase in dementia among the 65+ population, the possibility of living to be 300 is not altogether good news. But fortunately our brains are the concern of the brains at UCSF.