Child predators & citizen cops: part two

Where are the limits to the rights of self-protection? Has the internet’s ability to make instant connections also created instant-cops who can go too far?

Earlier today I posted a story about a suspected predator in my local San Francisco park who turned out to be an innocent man — but only after his photo and suspicions of his being a predator had circulated widely on the internet and local TV, thanks to a campaign started by an anxious mom. She had spotted him near the playground, unaccompanied by a child.

Several readers have weighed in off-site to say I should have more sympathy for the mom, because she was only protecting her child and others. Maybe.

Years ago, when my own children were growing up in an urban area comparable in potential lurking dangers to San Francisco today, there was a man who appeared around elementary schools over a period of months, exposing himself to little girls. He became fairly famous among teachers, parents and children as “the man in the white car”, though he always managed to elude the police.

One afternoon when my then 7-year-old daughter was walking home alone (the school was about 3 blocks distant and the times were not quite so parentally protective) a white car pulled alongside her, stopped just ahead and the passenger-side door opened. But about a half block away was my 9-year-old son, lagging an appropriate distance behind.  He sped up, taking a pencil out of his pocket and calling his sister’s name, which was enough to cause the white car to scratch off — but not before they had written down his license number. Extraordinary children, of course, as they are mine, but to be truthful every kid in town had been so thoroughly trained in what to do it was practically a reflex reaction.

The man lived about a mile away. The police paid several calls on him. Because he had not been actually caught doing anything, and it had been over six months since the last episode, involving a child who couldn’t give any description, he was not accused of anything. But the police knew where he lived (as did I, since they drove my son by the house to reconfirm it was the car) and he knew they knew, and he knew his license number was in a file of some sort that could be easily found. That was the last episode involving the man in the white car and local schools.

Could he have gone on to frighten, and possibly molest, other children? Probably. Should we have painted a red “X” on his door, or taken his picture and put it up in the post office? I don’t think so. Plenty of phone calls flew back and forth, but there were no cellphone cameras or e-mails or internet sites at the time so the net was not cast quite as wide. And nobody called the TV station.

I am still pretty sure the man in the white car was a bad guy. We now know the man in the neighborhood park was not. In either case, there’s that business of being innocent until proven guilty. Trial by internet can mess with the system, which while imperfect is still the best we’ve got.

2 responses

  1. As a society, we talk out of both sides of our mouth. When it comes to BP and the Gulf oil spill we all cry “This was so preventable.” Yet, when we know or suspect a child molester is in our midst, we’re supposed to back off? Tell that to all the kids who have been abused by these monsters, or to the mothers of children who died at their hands. Sorry, this is one instance in which the impact of not finding these guys is so horrific and the psychic scars so deep, I think special circumstances where our laws are concerned should apply. It’s my understanding that these men rarely respond to rehabilitation. If we’re not willing to forcibly commit them to institutions at the state’s expense, then the laws need to be re-written to make sure they do no harm.

    • I wholeheartedly agree with you, inmyhumbleopinion; and believe your humble opinion is right on. Where I take issue is in the case of an innocent man (which the guy in the park, see post below, definitely was) having his life pretty much wrecked because well-intended citizens, and local TV, went too far. In the case of my kids and the man in the white car, maybe the police didn’t go far enough. But I do believe police and courts should be in charge, even if ordinary citizens are rightly encouraged to help with matters of public safety.

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